Italy, 500 Lire 1981

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wb01-0201b_f_600x600wb01-0201b_b_600x600wb01-0201_cov_600x600wb01-0201a_f_600x600wb01-0201a_b_600x600


CATALOG INFORMATION
ID Number: WB01-0201
Category: Commemorative Coins
Description: Italy, 500 Lire 1981
Country or State: Italy
Year: 1981
Period: Republic (2 June 1946 - present)
Head of State/Ruler:  
Reign:  
Currency: Lira
Face Value: 500 Lire
Subject/Theme: 2000th Anniversary of the death of Publio Virgilio Marone (Publius Vergilius Maro)
Obverse: Laurel head of Virgilius facing left. Below the neck the name of the author
Obverse Legend: REPVBBLICA ITALIANA - P · VERGILIUS · M - MM · POST · ANNOS
Obverse Designer: Laura Cretara
Reverse: In the middle a tree, symbol of Fertility. At sides, facing the tree, the figure of an ox that represents the work, and of a horse, symbol of epic poetry. On the left, 19 A.C. year of death of the Latin poet, and on the right, the year 1981. In the exergue, the value and the mintmark.
Reverse Legend: 19 A.C.; 1981; L.500; R
Reverse Designer: Laura Cretara
Edge: REPVBBLICA ITALIANA
Note: Sealed in Proof Seal (Ministero del Tesoro), Total weight: 42.0 grams
Mint Mark: R (Rome)
Composition: Silver (Ag) 0.835
Diameter: 29.3 mm
Thickness:  
Weight: 11.00 grams (0.2953 oz.)
Mintage: 340'998
Krause & Mishler Number: KM# 110
Other Catalog Number: Gigante: 953
State of Conservation: Proof (Prf), permanent seal
Rarity:  
   

CATALOG VALUE
Proof (Prf) € 18.00
Brilliant Uncirculated (BU) € -
Mint State/Mint Condition (MS) € -
Uncirculated (Unc) € 15.00
Extremely Fine (XF) € -
Very Fine (VF) € -
Fine (F) € -
Very Good (VG) € -
Good (G) € -
   

HISTORICAL NOTES

Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), usually called Virgilio in Italian or Vergil in English, was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He is known for three major works of Latin literature, the Eclogues (or Bucolics), the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid. A number of minor poems, collected in the Appendix Vergiliana, are sometimes attributed to him.

Virgil is traditionally ranked as one of Rome's greatest poets. His Aeneid has been considered the national epic of ancient Rome from the time of its composition to the present day. Modeled after Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, the Aeneid follows the Trojan refugee Aeneas as he struggles to fulfill his destiny and arrive on the shores of Italy—in Roman mythology the founding act of Rome. Virgil's work has had wide and deep influence on Western literature, most notably Dante's Divine Comedy, in which Virgil appears as Dante's guide through hell and purgatory.