State of Manitoba, 1970

nb01-0104b_f_600x600
nb01-0104b_f_600x600nb01-0104b_b_600x600


CATALOG INFORMATION
ID Number: NB01-0104
Category: Medals and Tokens
Description: State of Manitoba, 1970
Country or State: Canada, State of Manitoba
Year: 1970
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Currency:  
Face Value:  
Subject/Theme: Manitoba 1870 -1970, 100th Year Commemorative
Obverse: Bufalo looking over the landscape
Obverse Legend: 100th YEAR
Obverse Designer:  
Reverse: Native Indian with Ranger
Reverse Legend: MANITOBA CENTENNIAL YEAR
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Mint Mark:  
Composition: Bronze
Diameter: 38.00 mm
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Weight: 32.00 grams (Includes Seal)
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State of Conservation: Proof (Prf)
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CATALOG VALUE
Proof (Prf) € -
Brilliant Uncirculated (BU) € -
Mint State/Mint Condition (MS) € -
Uncirculated (Unc) € -
Extremely Fine (XF) € -
Very Fine (VF) € -
Fine (F) € -
Very Good (VG) € -
Good (G) € -
   

HISTORICAL NOTES

Manitoba is a Canadian prairie province. The province, with an area of 649,950 square kilometres (250,900 sq mi), has a largely continental climate, with thousands of lakes and many rivers. Agriculture, mostly concentrated in the fertile southern and western parts of the province, is vital to the province's economy; other major industries are transportation, manufacturing, mining, forestry, energy, and tourism. The word "Manitoba" comes from the native word manitou, meaning spirit. Lake Manitoba was named earlier, north of Portage la Prairie.

Manitoba's capital and largest city, Winnipeg, is Canada's eighth-largest Census Metropolitan Area, and home to 60 percent of the population of the province. Winnipeg is the seat of government, home to the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba and the highest court in the jurisdiction, the Manitoba Court of Appeal. Four of the province's five universities, all four of its professional sports teams, and most of its cultural activities are located in Winnipeg.

The name Manitoba (meaning "strait of the spirit" or "lake of the prairies") is believed to be derived from the Cree, Ojibwe or Assiniboine language. Fur traders first arrived during the late 17th century and Manitoba was the heart of Rupert's Land, owned by the Hudson's Bay Company. Manitoba became a province of Canada in 1870 after the Red River Rebellion. A general strike took place in Winnipeg in 1919, and the province was hit hard by the Great Depression. This led to the creation of what would become the New Democratic Party of Manitoba, one of the province's major political parties and currently in power, led by premier Greg Selinger.