Italy, 500 Lire 1974

sb10-0101_f_600x600
sb10-0101_f_600x600sb10-0101_b_600x600


CATALOG INFORMATION
ID Number: SB10-0101
Category: Paper Money
Description: Italy, 500 Lire 1974
Country or State: Italy
Year: Decreto Ministeriale 14.02.1974
Period: Republic (2 June 1946 - present)
Head of State/Ruler:  
Reign:  
Currency: Lira
Face Value: 500 ₤ - Italian lira
Subject/Theme: Green-Blue Mercury at right
Obverse: Winged head of Mercury, a god of trade and a messenger in Roman mythology
Obverse Legend: Repubblica Italiana. Cinquecento Lire. Biglietto di stato a corso legale. Il direttore generale del tesoro. Il cassiere speciale. V' per la corte dei conti.
Obverse Designer: L. Vangelli
Reverse: Bellerophon riding Pegasus
Reverse Legend: LIRE CINQUECENTO
Reverse Designer: L. Vangelli
Signatures: Miconi-Nardi-Fabiano
Printer: Istituto Poligrafico dello Stato, Officina Carte Valori di Roma
Edge:  
Note:  
Mintage: 301,000,000
Dimensions (B x H): 114 x 57 mm
Krause Catalog Number:  
Other Catalog Number: World Paper Money: P-94a.1
State of Conservation: Very Fine (VF)
Rarity:  
   

CATALOG VALUE
Uncirculated (Unc) € 2.00
Extremely Fine (XF) € -
Very Fine (VF) € 1.00
Fine (F) € -
Very Good (VG) € 0.50
Good (G) € -
Poor (P) € -
   

HISTORICAL NOTES
Mercury (Latin: Mercurius) is a major Roman god, being one of the Dii Consentes within the ancient Roman pantheon. He is the patron god of financial gain, commerce, eloquence (and thus poetry), messages/communication (including divination), travelers, boundaries, luck, trickery and thieves; he is also the guide of souls to the underworld. He was considered the son of Maia and Jupiter in Roman mythology. His name is possibly related to the Latin word merx ("merchandise"; compare merchant, commerce, etc.), mercari (to trade), and merces (wages); another possible connection is the Proto-Indo-European root merĝ- for "boundary, border" and Greek οὖρος (by analogy of Arctūrus/Ἀρκτοῦρος), as the "keeper of boundaries," referring to his role as bridge between the upper and lower worlds. In his earliest forms, he appears to have been related to the Etruscan deity Turms; both gods share characteristics with the Greek god Hermes. He is often depicted holding the caduceus in his left hand.