Basileus Megas Eukratdhs, 171-145 BC

ac06-0401_f_600x600
ac06-0401_f_600x600ac06-0401_b_600x600


CATALOG INFORMATION
ID Number: AC06-0401
Category: Ancient Coins
Description: Basileus Megas Eukratdhs, 171-145 BC
Country or State: BAKTRIA (Bactria or Bactriana (from Greek Βακτριανή), (It was a part of the eastern periphery of the Iranian world, now part of Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan)
Year:  
Period: 171-145 BC
Head of State/Ruler: BASILEUS MEGAS EUKRATIDHS also known as Eukratides I Megas
Reign: 171-145 BC
Currency: Tetradrachm
Face Value:  
Subject/Theme:  
Obverse: Conjoined and draped busts right of Heliokles (father of Eukratides) and Laodike (mother of Eukratides)
Obverse Legend: HLIOKLEOUS KAI LAODIKHS
Obverse Designer:  
Reverse: Helmeted and draped bust right of Eukratides I
Reverse Legend: BASILEUS MEGAS EUKRATIDHS
Reverse Designer:  
Edge: Irregular
Note: This dynastic type is one of the great rarities of Baktria, which was founded c.a. 256 BC, when Diodotos revolted against Antiochos II of Syria. Baktria was the most easterly kingdom of the ancient Greek world
Mint Mark:  
Composition: Sliver (Ag)
Diameter: 28.0 mm (irregular)
Thickness:  
Weight: 15.1 grams
Mintage:  
Krause & Mishler Number:  
Other Catalog Number: SNG ANS 528-9; Mitchiner 1725-1727 var.
State of Conservation: Extremely Fine (XF)
Rarity: Very rare, extremely so with obverse head left. Porous with some flan faults as made. All portraits are well-struck, distinct, and in high relief. Sharpness of Choice Very Fine. Estimated Value € 5000 - € 7500
   

CATALOG VALUE
Proof (Prf) € -
Brilliant Uncirculated (BU) € -
Mint State/Mint Condition (MS) € -
Uncirculated (Unc) € -
Extremely Fine (XF) € 7500.00
Very Fine (VF) € 5000.00
Fine (F) € -
Very Good (VG) € -
Good (G) € -
   

HISTORICAL NOTES

Eucratides I Megas was one of the most important Greco-Bactrian kings. He uprooted the Euthydemid dynasty of Greco-Bactrian kings and replaced it with his own lineage. He fought against the Indo-Greek kings, the easternmost Hellenistic rulers in northwestern India, temporarily holding territory as far as the Indus, until he was finally defeated and pushed back to Bactria. Eucratides had a vast and prestigious coinage, suggesting a rule of considerable importance.

Eucratides came to the throne by overthrowing the dynasty of Euthydemus I in Bactria, whose son Demetrius was conquering northwestern India. The king Eucratides dethroned in Bactria was probably Antimachus I.

It is unclear whether Eucratides was a Bactrian official who raised a rebellion, or, according to some scholars, a cousin of the Seleucid king Antiochus IV Epiphanes who was trying to regain the Bactrian territory. Justin explains that Eucratides acceeded to the throne at about the same time as Mithridates, whose rule is accurately known to have started in 171 BC, thereby giving an approximate date for the accession of Eucratides.