Demetrios I Poliorketes. 294–288 BC

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ac06-0402_f_600x600ac06-0402_b_600x600


CATALOG INFORMATION
ID Number: AC06-0402
Category: Ancient Coins
Description: Demetrios I Poliorketes. 294–288 BC
Country or State: MACEDONIAN KINGDOM
Year:  
Period: Pella mint. Struck circa 294-293 BC
Head of State/Ruler: Demetrius I, called Poliorcetes, son of Antigonus I Monophthalmus and Stratonice, was a king of Macedon (294–288 BC). He belonged to the Antigonid dynasty.
Reign: 294–288 BC
Currency: Tetradrachm
Face Value:  
Subject/Theme:  
Obverse: Nike, blowing a trumpet and holding a stylis in her left hand, alighting to left on the prow of a galley decorated with an apotropaic eye.
Obverse Legend:  
Obverse Designer:  
Reverse: Poseidon, nude but for chlamys wrapped around his outstretched left arm, striding left, hurling trident with his right hand; to left, monogram; between Poseidon’s legs.
Reverse Legend: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ
Reverse Designer:  
Edge: Irregular
Note:  
Mint Mark:  
Composition:  
Diameter: ~28.0 mm (irregular)
Thickness:  
Weight: 10.8 grams
Mintage:  
Krause & Mishler Number:  
Other Catalog Number: Newell 23
State of Conservation: Extremely Fine (XF), lightly toned
Rarity:  
   

CATALOG VALUE
Proof (Prf) € -
Brilliant Uncirculated (BU) € -
Mint State/Mint Condition (MS) € -
Uncirculated (Unc) € -
Extremely Fine (XF) € -
Very Fine (VF) € -
Fine (F) € -
Very Good (VG) € -
Good (G) € -
   

HISTORICAL NOTES

Demetrios I Poliorketes was the son of one of Alexander's greatest generals, Antigonos I Monophthalmos. Antigonos was arguably the strongest of Alexander’s followers, the diadochs, at one time ruling over all of Alexander's eastern territories from Asia Minor to Baktria, except for Egypt.

Antigonos’ success led him to be the first diadoch to crown himself king, in 306 BC. By that time, Demetrios was an active participant in his father's wars, and was also crowned king along with his father.

Fearing Antigonos’ growing power, other diadochs allied themselves against him, and finally defeated and killed him at the battle of Ipsos in 301 BC. Following Ipsos, Demetrios continued to battle the other diadochs, and although he won numerous victories, he was usually unable to maintain his control over his conquests afterward.

His epithet, Poliorketes ('besieger of cities') was earned following his siege of Rhodes. While that siege ultimately failed, it featured a number of elaborate siege engines which had become a hallmark of Demetrios' style of warfare. Demetrios was eventually abandoned by his army, and he subsequently surrendered to Seleukos I of Syria in 288 BC. Demetrios died in captivity five years later.